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Battle of Bagdad 2006



 
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PostPosted: 14.10.2006, 22:38    Post subject: Battle of Bagdad 2006 Reply with quote

Sept. 14, 2006 - This week, NEWSWEEK begins “War Stories,” the first in its series of Web reports about the daily lives of the soldiers and families of the 4-23 infantry battalion of the 172nd Stryker Brigade. Informed in late July that their yearlong deployment in Iraq would be extended for another four months, the soldiers are now fighting on the front lines of the Battle of Baghdad. The impact of this move on the troops and their loved ones was the subject of the report, "Straight to the Heart,” in NEWSWEEK's Sept. 18 issue. During the unit's extended tour, which is expected to last until December, our reporters will continue to tell the story of the 4-23 through the individual tales of a small group of soldiers and the families who anxiously await their return back at Fort Richardson, Alaska, and in hometowns across America. But as the close-knit 4-23 community learned this week, not everyone will be coming home now.

The call came over Capt. Brad Velotta's radio with the audible clarity that only shocking news can bring. Shots fired, the voice said, with one soldier down, "shot in the head by a sniper." Velotta and his men jumped up from the chai-and-chat session in the home of a local sheik in Baghdad's Shaab neighborhood, just north of Sadr City. They had been discussing the role of Coalition forces, the purpose of the Stryker mission and even such concepts as war and peace. Now reality came crashing back in. "This is the kind of peace we were talking about," Velotta remarked ironically as he hurried out of the house.

This account of that afternoon, and what followed at the hospital, is based on the recollections of NEWSWEEK photographer Lucian Read, who was embedded with the 4-23's Blackhawk Company. It was the 33rd day in what's been dubbed the Battle of Baghdad. It was the day when the battalion lost its first soldier, after having an almost unheard-of year with no deaths. It was also the day when Velotta's worst fear—the nightmare all leaders prepare for—came true. " This is the best opportunity to be killed," he had said the week before, noting the risk tended to be worst while a unit is new to an area. "The learning curve is steep."

Now it had happened. When they heard the news, Velotta and his men sprinted down the street, keeping an eye out for the sniper. They piled into their Stryker armored vehicles and headed off in a convoy to the military hospital in the Green Zone. The men in Velotta's vehicle didn't know who had been hit. Names aren't said over the radio, only the soldier's battle number. "Who is it, who is it?" asked the unit's translator, an Iraqi man who had been with the 4-23 for over a year.

Driving fast though the streets, they heard another, final, chilling call on the radio. It came from Capt. Patrick (Doc) Williams, a physician's assistant and the battalion's medic. A year earlier, on one of his first patrols in Iraq, Williams had saved the life of soldier who was mortally wounded. His efforts won him the Silver Star for Valor. "Based on the condition of the patient, we don’t need to drive in a way that puts more people at risk," he said. Translation: the soldier didn’t make it.

When the body of Cpl. Alexander Jordan, 31, was unloaded at the hospital, it was already wrapped and covered. The doctors at the hospital prepared Jordan for a viewing in the morgue—cleaning his wounds, taping his eyes shut. The men filed in, faces stoic, shocked, teary eyed. The unit's translator, whose name is being withheld for security reasons, did not contain his grief. He had lived and sweated alongside the men of Blackhawk Company for more than a year, volunteering to come with them from Mosul to Baghdad. He wailed, hiding his face against the blast walls. An hour of whispered and broken conversations passed. Williams said that he had never before lost a wounded man who had been under his care. His uniform and boots were darkened with blood. Before leaving, Velotta reminded his men: "Revenge is wrong, this can't change the way we do our job."

The U.S. military says the job of the 4-23 in Baghdad is to stop an Iraqi civil war. To do this, the 172nd Stryker Brigade is focusing on the neighborhoods in Baghdad that are "the fault lines of sectarian violence, the dead zones," says Lt. Col. John Norris, the 4-23's battalion commander. These are the places in the city where empty lots are dumping grounds for literally hundreds of bodies, places where the graffiti on the walls say things like AVENUE OF DEATH. In these neighborhoods, the mosques have become mini-fortresses with sandbagged fighting positions on the roof and the trash-filled streets are closed off by makeshift barriers of concrete blocks, concertina wire and stumps from palm trees. Going house to house-so far the 172 nd has searched more than 50,000 homes in Baghdad—they are trying to establish security so the struggling Iraqi government has some breathing room to "to get them on their feet, to delay prolonged enemy contact," says Norris. "You're buying time for the systems to get into place." The idea is to use the "swarm effect" of the Stryker vehicles, putting an overwhelming presence on the streets in an attempt to make them safe again.

The civil war, though, has likely already begun. Or so it seemed in the first neighborhood they secured. The first of these fault lines for the 4-23 was Ghazaliya, a mostly Sunni area in western Baghdad. The residents were surprisingly happy to see Americans—Sunnis have traditionally been hostile to the U.S. presence—saying it was the first time in weeks they were able to open up their stores and walk outside freely. Many of the Iraqis appeared pale, blinking in the bright sunlight. Homes on every block were abandoned, and sewage filled the streets in what was once a place for the upper crust of Iraqi society. After a week of searches in the second week of August, the commanders saw promising signs—the 4-23 raided five mosques, and in three they uncovered weapons suspected of being used to kill Americans and Shiites. In the Al-Sadiq mosque, affiliated with the Iraqi Islamic Party, there were mortars hidden in the minarets and scores of IED's buried in the courtyard. At another Sunni mosque they discovered a suspected "beheading knife." They even searched the Iraqi Islamic Party's headquarters in Ghazaliya, discovering more bombmaking equipment, black coffins to smuggle weapons and documents detailing how the IIP was running a network of militiamen—and possibly death squads—to guard the neighborhood. In the neighborhood of Shula, the 4-14 battalion in the 172 nd, busted a cache of weapons suspected of belonging to the Mahdi Army, the militia of Shiite leader Moqtada al-Sadr. A blow, the commanders said, to each side in the sectarian conflict.

The third week of the operation brought them to the neighborhood of Adamiyah. Despite violence that continued throughout much of Baghdad, their intelligence reports were saying they were making a dent in the areas they had searched. Attacks in Baghdad appeared to be falling in some areas, with a sharp drop off of in kidnappings. But they also started to feel the pinch of Iraqi politics—no longer were they allowed the same access to mosques, which they believed to still be hiding weapons. And it also became apparent that much of the sectarian violence was originating in Sadr City, an area that has been basically off limits to Coalition forces. The soldiers even took friendly bets on when and if they would do a full-scale operation in the impoverished Shiite neighborhood. "We're handcuffing ourselves," said one officer. Then he added, referring back to Vietnam: "Now I know how guys 30 years ago were feeling."

It was in another Shiite neighborhood, Shaab, near Sadr City, where Cpl. Jordan was killed. Twice earlier in the day the 4-23 had received gunfire; a few weeks before, near the same neighborhood, Velotta's convoy had been unsuccessfully IED'd in a complex ambush. But on that day, Sept. 10, 2006, the streets were crowded with more than 50 children, and the adults did not appear hostile. They hadn't seen American forces in a long time, they said, an observation the soldiers in the 4-23 had heard over and over again. The peace was shattered by a sniper's bullet. Word spread quickly back home in cryptic e-mails and strained phone conversations with loved ones. The memorial service for Cpl. Jordan of Miami was held last night in Camp Stryker, Iraq. But the grieving for a fallen comrade and son will go on.
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PostPosted: 14.10.2006, 22:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.mnf-iraq.com/
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PostPosted: 14.10.2006, 22:44    Post subject: ????? Reply with quote

http://www.icasualities.org/
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PostPosted: 14.10.2006, 22:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

We put accuracy above speed and do not update the data base until we have located and cross-checked two or more independent approved news sources for the same incident (for more details see our Methodology). If you want to submit news stories that could help us confirm an incident involving civilian deaths please email news item weblinks to news@iraqbodycount.org (the more specific and detailed, the better).

Still, your "maximum" count seems very low to me. Surely there must be many, many more civilian deaths than you've published.

We are not a news organization ourselves and like everyone else can only base our information on what has been reported so far. What we are attempting to provide is a credible compilation of civilian deaths that have been reported by recognized sources. Our maximum therefore refers to reported deaths - which can only be a sample of true deaths unless one assumes that every civilian death has been reported. It is likely that many if not most civilian casualties will go unreported by the media. That is the sad nature of war.

(more Q-FAQs to be added soon)


Home Quick-FAQ About In the media Falluja Archive Press releases Contacts Links A Week in Iraq Participate!
The worldwide update of reported civilian deaths in the Iraq war and occupation.
The IRAQ BODY COUNT Database
This is an ongoing human security project which maintains and updates the world’s only independent and comprehensive public database of media-reported civilian deaths in Iraq that have resulted from the 2003 military intervention by the USA and its allies. The count includes civilian deaths caused by coalition military action and by military or paramilitary responses to the coalition presence (e.g. insurgent and terrorist attacks). It also includes excess civilian deaths caused by criminal action resulting from the breakdown in law and order which followed the coalition invasion.

Results and totals are continually updated and made immediately available here and on various IBC web counters which may be freely displayed on any website or homepage, where they are automatically updated without further intervention. Casualty figures are derived from a comprehensive survey of online media reports from recognized sources. Where these sources report differing figures, the range (a minimum and a maximum) are given. This method is also used to deal with any residual uncertainty about the civilian or non-combatant status of the dead. All results are independently reviewed and error-checked by at least three members of the Iraq Body Count project team before publication.
METHODOLOGY AND DETAILS... English Arabic En Español En Français Greek In Italiano Em Portugues



Reported civilian deaths resulting from the US-led military intervention in Iraq
Sort by newest additions first most recent first largest entry first (as of Friday, 13th October 2006) KEY to Columns

Pages 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20 - 21 - 22 - 23 - 24 - 25 - 26 - 27 - 28 - 29 - 30 - 31 - 32 - 33 - 34 - 35 - 36 - 37 - 38 - 39 - 40 - 41 - 42 - 43 - 44 - 45 - 46 - 47 - 48 - 49 - 50 - 51 - 52 - 53 - 54 - 55 - 56 - 57 - 58 - 59 - 60 - 61 - 62 - 63 - 64 - 65 - 66 - 67 - 68 - 69 - 70 - 71 - 72 - 73 - 74 - 75 - 76 - 77 - 78 - 79 - 80 - 81 - 82 - 83 - 84 - 85 - 86 - 87 - 88 - 89 - 90 - 91 - 92 - 93 - 94 Next > (Single Page Version)
Incident
code Date Time Location Target Weapons Reported Minimum Reported Maximum Sources...
43937 48783
x640 4 Jul 2006 - Falluja policeman Gunfire 1 1 REU 05 jul
MOH Jul 2006
x639 4 Jul 2006 PM Al-Tahreer area in Baqouba - Gunfire 1 1 KUNA 05 Jul
MoH Jul 2006
x638 4 Jul 2006 - different parts of Mosul three civilians, one policeman Gunfire 4 4 REU 04 Jul
MoH Jul 2006
x637 4 Jul 2006 - Hawija, 70 km SW of Kirkuk Iraqi army checkpoint, civilians hit mortar rounds 1 1 KUNA 04 Jul
REU 04 Jul
x636 3 Jul 2006 3:00 AM Khouz village, 110 km west of Baghdad residential building US air strike 2 2 DPA 03 Jul
MoH Jul 2006
x635 3 Jul 2006 - Diwaniya alcohol traders Gunfire 2 2 REU 03 Jul
MOH Jul 2006
x634 3 Jul 2006 - Kirkuk police patrol Gunfire 1 1 KUNA 03 Jul
MoH Jul 2006
x633 3 Jul 2006 - road between Baquba and Kaanaan convoy of Diyala governor, policeman killed bomb 1 1 KUNA 03 Jul
MOH Jul 2006
x632 2 Jul 2006 - Al-Amin neighbourhood in eastern Baquba - two mortar shells mortars 2 2 Al-Shar 02 Jul
MoH Jul 2006
x631 2 Jul 2006 - Muhammad Bakir al-Hakeem Hospital, Shula neighborhood, N Baghdad - mortars 8 8 WP 02 Jul
MoH Jul 2006
x630 2 Jul 2006 - Mosul - Gunfire 1 1 REU 02 Jul
MoH July 2006
x629 2 Jul 2006 - Khairnabat, near Baquba funeral-goers Gunfire 2 2 REU 02 Jul
MoH Jul 2006
x628 2 Jul 2006 - Baquba two people in separate atacks Gunfire 2 2 REU 02 Jul
MoH Jul 2006
k3986 17 Sep 2006 PM Al-Ramadi Ahmed Riyadh al-Karbouli, TV journalist gunfire 1 1 KUNA 18 Sep
DPA 19 Sep
k3985 14 Sep 2006 -
15 Sep 2006 - Baghdad bodies found shot, tortured gunfire, executed, tortured 49 51 RFE 15 Sep
BBC 15 Sep
XIN 15 Sep
KUNA 15 Sep
k3984 16 Sep 2006 - Zafarniya, Baghdad police patrol roadside bomb 3 3 LAT 17 Sep
AP 16 Sep
k3983 16 Sep 2006 - Baquba police patrol roadside bomb 3 3 LAT 17 Sep
REU 16 Sep
k3982 16 Sep 2006 12:00 PM Dora, Baghdad US/Iraqi patrol at police station suicide car bomb 1 1 AFP 17 Sep
XIN 16 Sep
k3980 16 Sep 2006 AM Karbala man on way to work gunfire 1 1 VOI 16 Sep
AFP 17 Sep
k3979 15 Sep 2006 -
16 Sep 2006 - Baghdad bodies found shot, tortured gunfire, executed, tortured 47 50 REU 17 Sep
CNN 16 Sep
KUNA 16 Sep
NYT 17 Sep
k3977 14 Sep 2006 - Baghdad bodies found shot, tortured gunfire, executed, tortured 20 43 AFP 15 Sep
AP 14 Sep
CNN 15 Sep
NYT 15 Sep
k3976 14 Sep 2006 - Baquba - gunfire 6 6 AFP 15 Sep
Al-Shar 14 Sep
k3975 14 Sep 2006 PM northeast Baghdad near bakery motorcycle bomb 1 1 GDN 15 Sep
CNN 15 Sep
k3974 14 Sep 2006 - Tal Afar police checkpoint suicide bomber 1 1 CNN 15 Sep
REU 14 Sep
k3973 14 Sep 2006 - Al-Urubah, Al-Amarah Ahmad Mahdi Wajid and Sa'd Ammar, former Baath Party members gunfire 2 2 Al-Shar 14 Sep
AFP 14 Sep
k3972 14 Sep 2006 AM Hurriya, Baghdad police patrol car bomb 1 1 XIN 14 Sep
Al-Shar 14 Sep
k3971 14 Sep 2006 - Street 52, Karrada, Baghdad passport office or orphanage car bomb 10 10 KUNA 14 Sep
DPA 14 Sep
k3970 14 Sep 2006 - Doura, Baghdad Muthana Ali Hussein, traffic policeman gunfire 1 1 REU 14 Sep
Al-Shar 14 Sep
k3969 14 Sep 2006 - west Baghdad Shiite family in home gunfire 6 6 IHT 14 Sep
REU 14 Sep
k3968 14 Sep 2006 PM Fallujah Iraqi army patrol roadside bomb 6 6 AP 14 Sep
CNN 15 Sep
k3967 14 Sep 2006 - Jisr al-Tahrir, Baquba police checkpoint drive-by shooting 2 2 CNN 15 Sep
Al-Shar 15 Sep
k3966 14 Sep 2006 - Al-Atshanah, Daqouq, Kirkuk tribal leader Abdullah Khalaf Azzawi and son Ghassan gunfire 2 2 LAT 15 Sep
KUNA 14 Sep
k3965 12 Sep 2006 AM Al-Zahraa, Mosul Kurdish family gunfire 4 4 KUNA 12 Sep
AP 13 Sep
k3964 12 Sep 2006 - Amel, Baghdad policeman gunfire 1 1 CNN 13 Sep
REU 13 Sep
k3963 12 Sep 2006 - Muqdadiya people in market roadside bomb 4 4 CNN 13 Sep
VOI 13 Sep
k3962 12 Sep 2006 - Abu Sayda, near Baquba police or army officer Brig. Gen. Ali Hassan Juburi roadside bomb 0 1 DPA 12 Sep
AFP 12 Sep
k3961 12 Sep 2006 - Mosul police captain Ziad Ramzi gunfire 1 1 KUNA 13 Sep
AP 13 Sep
k3960 12 Sep 2006 12:20 PM Near Falas restaurant, 14th Ramadan St., Mansour, Baghdad US military convoy car bomb 6 6 AP 13 Sep
AFP 12 Sep
k3959 12 Sep 2006 - Palestine Street, east Baghdad police patrol roadside bombs 1 2 VOI 12 Sep
REU 12 Sep
NYT 13 Sep
AFP 12 Sep
k3958 12 Sep 2006 - Hay al-Jihad, Wasit policeman gunfire 1 1 Al-Shar 12 Sep
Al-Istiq 13 Sep
k3957 12 Sep 2006 - Wasit bodies found shot, tortured gunfire, executed, tortured 5 5 Al-Shar 12 Sep
Al-Istiq 13 Sep
k3956 13 Sep 2006 - Zakhura Money Exchange, Harthiya, Baghdad owner of Zakhura Money Exchange gunfire 2 2 AFP 14 Sep
REU 13 Sep
k3955 13 Sep 2006 - Mashtal, east Baghdad police station mortar shells 2 2 KR 13 Sep
Times 13 Sep
k3954 13 Sep 2006 - Suwayra, in Tigris bodies found bodies found 4 5 REU 14 Sep
Tel 14 Sep
AP 14 Sep
Times 13 Sep
k3953 13 Sep 2006 - Al-Rashad police station, Jadida, Baghdad Al-Rashad police station mortar shells 1 1 KR 13 Sep
AFP 13 Sep
k3952 13 Sep 2006 11:30 AM electricity substation, Zayona, Baghdad police quards at electricity substation car bomb 8 9 AFP 14 Sep
CNN 13 Sep
AP 14 Sep
DPA 13 Sep
k3951 12 Sep 2006 -
13 Sep 2006 PM Ur, near Sadr City, Baghdad Safaa Ismael Enad, photographer for Al-Watan newspaper gunfire 1 1 LAT 14 Sep
VOI 14 Sep
k3950 12 Sep 2006 -
13 Sep 2006 - Between Khalis and Baquba Hadi Aanawi al-Joubouri, 'chairman of the Iraqi journalistsunion in Diyala' gunfire 1 1 KUNA 13 Sep
VOI 13 Sep
k3949 13 Sep 2006 9:00 AM near Al-Shaab Stadium, Baghdad traffic police headquarters roadside bomb, car bomb 14 20 XIN 13 Sep
KUNA 13 Sep
AFP 14 Sep
DPA 13 Sep
k3948 13 Sep 2006 - Baghdad bodies found shot, tortured gunfire, executed, tortured 60 65 AP 14 Sep
KUNA 13 Sep
KR 13 Sep
GUA 13 Sep
Incident
code Date Time Location Target Weapons Reported Minimum Reported Maximum Sources...
43937 48783
Reported civilian deaths resulting from the US-led military intervention in Iraq as of Friday, 13th October 2006

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Column Key: Please use Incident Code in correspondence about specific incidents - "Details..." immediately below the incident code links to personal information about those killed (when available). Date and Time refers to the incident, not the date it was reported, and may not always be exact. Spelling of Location can vary between media reports and will be corrected where possible - we suggest Encarta Online for reference. Targets are primarily as stated by military sources; Weapons refers to munitions and/or delivery vehicles. *NOTE: Some numbers have been lowered from those given in the original reports to adjust for potential double-counting by IBC. This means that occasionally the entry in the Max column (if more has been subtracted from it) may be lower than in the Min, as in x096. Refer to incident x073 for an example of our procedures for such entries. Full Discussion of Methodology and scope...



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